Suspension Repair

Suspension Repair 2018-03-30T22:14:05+00:00

What is suspension?

Your vehicle’s suspension is the system which connects the vehicle to its wheels and allows relative movement between the two.  Your suspension directly affects handling, smoothness, and safety.  If your suspension isn’t working properly, your risk of losing traction, rolling over, and losing control of the vehicle increases.  Even if you don’t notice any problems while driving, it is important that your suspension is inspected and serviced regularly.

Call Bill Tyson’s Auto Repair to inspect and service your suspension to ensure that it is performing as it should.

Suspension - Mercedes AMG GT

Suspension – Mercedes AMG GT

How does suspension work?

A vehicle’s suspension has many parts that help do the job.  Newer, or more advanced vehicles may have more parts, or even less, however, there are a few parts – which are common among most vehicle types – that you should get familiar with:

  • Shock absorbers and struts – While springs absorb the bumps, shock absorbers (or, in cars that have them, struts, which are similar to shocks) dampen the motion of the springs after a bump, keeping the vehicle from bouncing excessively.Shocks and struts are filled with a thick oil, and over time the oil can leak out, causing the shock or strut to fail. Impacts and accidents can also cause leakage or can damage delicate internal parts.
  •  Springs – Every car and truck today has some sort of mechanism to absorb large bumps, and this always includes some form of spring, a metal part that bends in response to force.Springs can sometimes break when the vehicle hits a bump very hard, and many will sag eventually (after many years), but in general these parts are much less prone to failure than most other suspension components.
  • Wheels and tires – Tires aren’t always considered part of the suspension, but they’re arguably the most important component of it. Tires provide traction for acceleration, braking, and cornering, and they absorb small bumps.Tires wear over time, and are subject to cuts and punctures from hitting sharp objects, and to slow or sudden leaks from impacts. On the other hand, wheels fail (from bending or cracking) much less often, usually only in response to hard impacts from accidents or hitting potholes.
  • Linkages – Every suspension includes various rods and other connecting pieces that collectively keep the wheels where they’re supposed to be relative to the rest of the vehicle. Most of these linkages are solid metal parts that rarely fail except in major accidents. However, sometimes linkages and associated bushings are sold together, and the failure of a bushing can necessitate replacing the whole assembly.
  • Bushings, bearings, and joints – Because most parts of any suspension must be movable, the various linkages are connected by flexible connections. These include bushings and bearings, which are connections that allow a small amount of twisting or sliding, often without needing lubrication, and joints, which in automotive applications often use a lubricant such as grease to allow for controlled movement.Some suspension bushings are made of rubber, which can become brittle or break over time, leading to failure. Many joints tend to wear out, leading initially to looseness and eventually to failure. A couple of the most common culprits are tie rod ends, which are lubricated joints that connects certain steering linkage parts, ball joints, which are found in both the steering system and attached to the control arms, and the bushings that separate the control arms from the vehicle’s frame.
  • Steering systems – Every steering systems contains numerous linkages, some joints such as the tie rod ends mentioned above, and some sort of steering box, the mechanical device that converts rotation of the steering wheel into movement of the car’s wheels.In general, linkages aren’t very likely to fail, while components such as tie rod ends are. Steering boxes wear out eventually, with rack-and-pinion steering systems in vehicles equipped with hydraulic power steering being the most failure prone.
  • Hydraulic power steering – Many vehicles are equipped with power steering. Of the two types of power steering, hydraulic systems (i.e., those that use a high-pressure fluid to help the driver turn the wheels) are more failure-prone. Fluid can leak from high-pressure lines, delicate valves occasionally wear out, the belt that drives the power steering pump can loosen or break, and eventually the pump itself may fail.
  • Electric power steering – More and more power steering systems found in modern cars and trucks are electric, not hydraulic. Electric power steering systems include various sensors, wires, and actuators (motors), any of which can fail, but luckily such failures are less common than failures of hydraulic components.

That’s a lot of parts, but it can be simplified into the following rule of thumb: softer parts wear out more quickly than harder ones, and wet ones more than dry ones. Thus, for example, a soft rubber bushing that has to change shape with every bump will probably need replacement (from wear or complete failure) before a solid metal rod will, and a shock absorber that contains fluid is more likely to fail than a metal spring.